Home > Uncategorized > Stan McDonald, who fought for guardianship and visits from his son, dies

Stan McDonald, who fought for guardianship and visits from his son, dies

Stan McDonald, who fought for many years for guardianship of his son, Andy, and championed a guardianship rights bill for parents of persons with developmental disabilities, died on May 6, his wife Ellen announced. He was 85.

We have written about Stan and Ellen’s attempts to overturn a lifetime ban imposed in 2006 by a probate court judge on visits by Andy to his hometown in Sherborn. Andy, who is now 53, is intellectually disabled, and has lived since 1993 in a group home funded by the Department of Developmental Services (DDS).

Ellen said this morning that despite the ban, Andy will be allowed to attend his father’s funeral in Sherborn. 

Stan, Andy, and Ellen in 2012

In 1986, Stan and his previous wife agreed to the appointment of a guardian for Andy as part of the settlement of a longstanding custody battle over him. Stan was unsuccessful in subsequent years in regaining his guardianship, even though his former wife, local legislators, and other supporters publicly expressed support for that.

In light of his experience, Stan waged a long-term battle for a bill in the state Legislature that would require that probate court judges consider parents as suitable guardians of persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities. COFAR is continuing to advocate for passage of the legislation, now H.1733.

In his 2006 ruling barring Andy from ever returning to Sherborn, former Probate Judge Edward Rockett stated that Andy had been arrested in 1990 for the sexual assault in his hometown, and was too dangerous to be allowed to ever return there. But it was apparently not the case that Andy was ever arrested or charged with a crime of sexual assault, according to Stan and Ellen.  Their claim appears to be backed up by the district court record and a subsequent police report.

The district court record states that Andy was arrested in Sherborn in May of 1990 for threatening an unidentified person during a telephone call.  The nature of the threats was not disclosed.  In July of that year, he was charged with disturbing the peace in downtown Sherborn, according to a police department report. That same day, he was charged with assault after he punched Ellen, his stepmother.  Stan and Ellen said the punch was accidental.

Stan and Ellen maintained that Andy has not exhibited any significant behavioral problems in the past decade. He has been taken on community outings to many places other than his home without any behavioral incidents, according to his yearly clinical care plans.  He was described in one care plan as “kind and friendly to others,” and as “a polite man.”

While an appeals court upheld Rocket’s decision in 2009, barring Andy from returning to Sherborn, the appeals court stated in a footnote that “some of the fact findings adopted by the judge (Rockett) were not supported by the evidence…” The footnote specifically stated, with regard to Rockett’s claims about the arrest for sexual assault, that “the specific facts (of the incidents in Sherborn) and the charges are not clear from the record.”

We have long called for an independent clinical evaluation of Andy. Such an evaluation was also urged by the McDonalds’ local legislators.

Stan and Ellen maintained that Andy is not dangerous and should be allowed supervised visits home.

Successful advocacy for Andy

While Stan never was granted guardianship of Andy, he was successful in advocating for better care for Andy in many instances. That advocacy included a successful effort to get clinicians to discontinue administering Stelazine, an anti-psychotic drug, to Andy. The drug had caused him to develop Tardive Dyskinesia, a disorder  resulting in involuntary, repetitive body movements.

Supporters urge restoration of Stan McDonald’s guardianship of Andy

In 2013, State Representative David Linsky, the main sponsor of Stan’s guardianship bill over the years, wrote a letter in support of Stan’s appointment as Andy’s guardian. Linsky noted that he had known Stan for 14 years and “can personally attest that he is deeply committed to his son Andy’s care and only wants the best for him.”

John Carroll, a former residential counselor to Andy at the Cardinal Cushing School, also wrote to DDS that year to say that he had frequently observed visits to Andy by Stan and Ellen, and that “I have seen theirs to be a bond that is unique and irreplaceable. Stanley’s and Ellen’s dedication to Andy’s care and treatment in all circumstances leaves no question in my mind that Stanley McDonald is the sole individual with the knowledge, experience, and love, deserving to have responsibility for major decisions in Andy’s life as guardian.”

And Stefan Grotz, the original court-appointed guardian in the case, wrote in 2002, after he had stepped down from that role, that “never have I met a more passionate advocate for a son than Stanley McDonald.” He strongly recommended to the court that McDonald be appointed as his son’s guardian. 

Guardianship bill

H.1733, which Stan advocated for continuously, would require probate court judges to presume that the parents of developmentally disabled persons, or third parties designated by the parents, are suitable as guardians for those individuals.

The bill would level the playing field in the DDS–probate court system, which often appears biased against families. As we have reported, probate judges frequently appoint attorneys as guardians of developmentally disabled persons, passing over their family members.

If they don’t have guardianship, family members can find themselves with virtually no rights or input into the care of their loved ones, and may even be excluded from contact with them.

In Stan’s memory, we would urge people to contact the Judiciary Committee, and urge the committee to act favorably on H.1733. The co-chairs are Senator James Eldridge (phone: 617- 722-1120; email: James.Eldridge@masenate.gov ) and Representative Michael Day (phone: 617-722-2396; email Michael.Day@mahouse.gov).

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