Home > Uncategorized > DDS may be violating federal law in not offering Wrentham and Hogan Centers as options for care

DDS may be violating federal law in not offering Wrentham and Hogan Centers as options for care

Recent reports from the Department of Developmental Services (DDS) to the state Legislature show a continually declining number of residents at the Wrentham Developmental Center and the Hogan Regional Center, and indicate there were no new admissions to either facility last year.

The reports have been submitted to the House and Senate Ways and Means Committees in compliance with a requirement each year in the state budget that DDS report on efforts “to close an ICF/IID (Intermediate Care Facility for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities).”

The reports appear to confirm that DDS is not offering ICFs/IID (or ICFs/IDD) as an option to persons waiting for residential placements in the DDS system.

If so, that would appear to be a violation of the Home and Community Based waiver of the federal Medicaid Law (42 U.S.C.1396n, s. 1915), which requires that intellectually disabled individuals and their guardians be informed of the available “feasible alternatives”  for residential placement and care.

In addition, the federal Rehabilitation Act (29 U.S.C., s. 794) states that no disabled person may be excluded or denied benefits from any program receiving federal funding.

The Wrentham and Hogan Centers, and three group homes at the former Templeton Developmental Center are the only remaining ICFs/IDD in the state. As such, they meet more stringent federal requirements for care and conditions than do other residential facilities, such as group homes, in the DDS Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) system.

The state budget language requiring reports on efforts to close ICFs/IDD appears to go back as far as Fiscal 2012, and it implies a bias in the Legislature against those facilities.

We were able to review the three most recent DDS reports to the Ways and Means Committees, for Calendar Years 2018, 2019, and 2020.

From 2018 to 2020, the reports state that the residential population or census at the Wrentham Center declined from 248 to 205, while admissions to the Center declined from only 2 in 2019, to 0 in 2020.

According to the DDS reports, the census at the Hogan Center declined from 119 in 2018 to 88 in 2020, while admissions declined from 18 in 2018, to 0 in 2020. (These census numbers don’t quite match up with other census data we have from the administration on the facilities, but all of the data show a continual decline in the census.)

Families largely satisfied with Wrentham and Hogan Center care

Based on the DDS reports, the decline in the census in both the Wrentham and Hogan Centers is largely due to deaths of residents in those facilities rather than discharges to the community system.

That would appear to support our observation over the years that parents and other family members of Hogan and Wrentham residents have been satisfied with the care at each of the Centers. If they were unsatisfied, they would have tried to seek community placements for their loved ones.

In our view, however, the DDS reports amount to a tacit admission by the Department that the Wrentham and Hogan Centers are eventually closing. The reports explicitly state that DDS will assure a “continuing ICF option” only for persons in the “Ricci class,” which are the dwindling number of people who are currently living in, or previously lived in, the state’s developmental centers.

Ben Ricci was the original plaintiff in the 1970s landmark federal class action lawsuit, Ricci v. Okin, that brought about upgrades in care for residents of the former Belchertown State School and other Massachusetts facilities for the developmentally disabled.

Those upgrades extended to the Wrentham and Hogan Centers. But the yearly DDS reports to the Legislature confirm our concern that DDS does not offer either the Wrentham or Hogan Centers as an option to people seeking residential placements for their loved ones with I/DD.

The declining census and admissions to the ICFs in Massachusetts are reflected in declining budget numbers for those facilities.  In the DDS budget for Fiscal Year 2022, the corporate provider-run group home line item has been funded at more than $1.4 billion. That represents a 91% increase over the funding appropriated for the same line item a decade previously.

In contrast, funding for state-operated group homes and the remaining ICFs has been on a relatively flat or downward trajectory respectively.

Lack of understanding of the role of ICFs

At both the state and national levels, there is a lack of understanding of the critical need for ICFs/IDD and the fact that they that house and serve people with the most severe and profound levels of disability and medical issues.

There is a pervasive and deep-seated ideology that ICFs are overly institutional and prohibitively expensive to operate. But that ideology is misguided.  As the VOR, an organization that advocates for persons with I/DD around the country, noted in a letter to the Senate Committee on Aging in Congress:

Community care does not provide the level or continuum of care needed by most of the I/DD population at the lowest level of these disabilities. Fewer necessary services are not proper care, and in the short-term (much less the long-term) do not provide necessary, life-sustaining care at the same cost level as ICFs.

Yet, the ideology at ICFs are no longer necessary can be found every year, as noted, in language in the Massachusetts budget.

Historical context of anti-ICF ideology

The anti-ICF stance of political leaders and policy makers and even many advocates for the disabled needs to be viewed in the historical context of the deinstitutionalization of people with mental illness and I/DD. That deinstitutionalization grew out of the warehouse conditions of the institutions prior to the 1980s.

Those anti-ICF advocates, however, have largely ignored upgrades in institutions, and particularly the efforts of the late U.S. District Court Judge Joseph L. Tauro, who oversaw the Ricci litigation that brought about improvements in institutional care in Massachusetts.

Deinstitutionalization has become a perfect storm of ideology and money that has kept a firm grip on our political system even though it has essentially been a failure for those it was meant to help. Deinstitutionalization has led to a tide of privatization of services for people with I/DD, and to skyrocketing salaries of executives of nonprofits that contact to provide residential and other care in the DDS system.

Proposed commission vulnerable to anti-ICF ideology

To this day, the anti-ICF ideology persists. At a June 21 legislative hearing in Massachusetts on a proposed state commission to study the history of state institutions for people with mental illness and I/DD, witness after witness denigrated ICF-level facilities as abusive and segregated from the wider community.

The hearing reinforced our concern that the makeup of the commission, as currently proposed, would provide fodder for those seeking to close the Wrentham and Hogan Centers.

As a result, we submitted testimony to a legislative committee considering bills to create the commission (S.1257 and H. 2090) that the commission should be reconstituted to recognize the significant upgrades in care and services that occurred in the state institutions as a result of the Ricci litigation overseen by Judge Tauro.

Calling for parity

That anti-ICF ideology is also reflected in President Biden’s American Jobs Plan, which includes $400 billion to expand access to Medicaid home and community-based services (HCBS) for seniors and people with disabilities.

In June, COFAR joined with AFSCME Council 93, a key Massachusetts state employee union, in warning that President Biden’s proposed $400 billion expansion of HCBS failed to provide any increase in funding for ICF-based care. As such, Biden’s plan could pose a threat to the future of ICF care and other state-run services.

In a jointly written letter to U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren, COFAR President Thomas J. Frain and AFSCME Council 93 Executive Director Mark Bernard expressed overall support for the expansion of access to HCBS for people with I/DD and the elderly. But the letter noted that without the inclusion of additional funding for ICFs, Biden’s plan would create a strong incentive for Massachusetts to close the Wrentham and Hogan facilities.

As of mid-August, there has been no response to our joint letter from Senator Warren or her staff.

All of this shows how much of an uphill battle it has been to make the case for ICF-level care in Massachusetts and other states. We will continue to work to get the message get out, before it is too late, that ICFs provide a critical safety net of care for some of our most vulnerable members of society.

As the DDS reports to the Legislature show, however, time is running out.

  1. Valerie Loveland
    August 18, 2021 at 4:58 pm

    What do they have ON cape cod. I can’t deal with another round of newbies with matteson and he can’t deal with it anymore either

    Valerie Loveland Young Living Brand Partner 774-212-3467 Haveyourcake123@outlook.com

    ________________________________

    Like

  2. August 18, 2021 at 5:37 pm

    My sister Laura and I just came from visiting our sister Jean at Wrentham Developmental Center. When we first arrived we had to wait a half hour because Jean was having her neck and shoulder massage – something that is a regular service included in her ISP by a licensed massage therapist to help with anxiety. The usual friendly staff was at her house, and we were so happy to see everyone wearing masks. We had a nice visit outside under the trees and Tom, another resident, dropped by on his bike to hang out with us for a while. Then we took a ride in the car for a while because that’s what Jean enjoys most, and she went home for dinner. I wish that everyone could have such nice visits and get such good care. Remember that despite whatever you are told, federal law allows you to request ICF care if you think that is what you want for your family member. Wishing all of you the best and keep up the great work. Thank you for the great blog, Dave!

    Colleen

    Liked by 1 person

    • August 18, 2021 at 11:22 pm

      Thanks for those great points about the Wrentham Center, Colleen, and the care provided there to your sister!

      Like

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